JISOP visits social protection institutions


A delegation of Journalists in Social Protection (JISOP) has called on key institutions to focus on issues of social protection.

The courtesy calls were to formally introduce JISOP to the institutions and establish a working relation towards a direct line of communication on social protection.

JISOP, within five days, called on the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection (MoGCSP), Deutsche Welle (DW), Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP) Programmes Secretariat and the Ghana School Feeding Programme Secretariat.

It also called on United Nations (UN) institutions such as the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), World Bank, World Health Organisation (WHO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), World Food Programme (WFP) as well as the International Labour Organistion (ILO).

There were dialogues among the representatives of the institutions and the journalists to solicit collaborations, which underscored the essence of the meetings.

Madam Emma Anaman, Head of Social Protection a
t WFP, during the engagement, said the gesture was commendable given the influence of news reports on social protection issues.

She reiterated the importance of JISOP as a team that delved into the issues of social protection, adding it was a step to give the subject the needed attention.

Mr Achaligabe Colson Akanbasiam, Head of Communication, LEAP Secretariat, expressed the Secretariat’s readiness to work with JISOP towards an enhanced social protection conversation in the interest of the public.

He noted that there was misinformation about the LEAP programme contrary to its activities, adding that liaising with JISOP would facilitate effective communication between the programme and members of the public.

JISOP, launched last year, is an independent network of journalists from various media houses trained to report on social protection.

It is a stakeholder in the Right Based Approach (RBA) to the social protection agenda of Ghana under the UNICEF’s social protection strategy and coordinated by the Just
ice Baidoo Consulting Limited (JBCL).

The members were drawn across all regions in the country and grouped into the Northern, Middle, and Southern zones.

Source: Ghana News Agency

CAMIFF is heading for the sky – Minister’s representative says at opening night

The Cameroon International Film Festival, CAMIFF began in the mountainside city of Buea with a call for all stakeholders to come on board.

The Director of Cinema at the Ministry of Arts and Culture (MINAC), Prof. Fai Donatus representing the Minister stated during the opening night after screening the movie, Half Heaven.

The Cameroon Movie, Half Heaven thrilled audiences who showed up on Monday, April 22, 2024. Directed by Johnscott Enah, the film now streaming on Prime Video and Amazon was widely enjoyed as a relatable epistle and an example of the strides of the Cameroon Movie Industry.

Prof. Fai Donatus expressed respect and admiration for CAMIFF’s vision bearer, Prince Agbor Gilbert. He then went ahead to call all stakeholders of the movie industry to come on board.

The senior civil servant applauded the organization which he admitted from the movie night has already moved him. ‘Everything that had transpired has changed my thinking,’ he said.

Prof. Fai lauded the passion and noted that CAMIFF is a f
lagship festival in the country. He praised all other stakeholders who together take up the work as a common purpose.

‘CAMIFF is now the platform on which young boys and girls are depending to promote their talent,’ Prof. Fai Donald observed.

Saluting members of the seventh art who turned out, he reminded all that ‘Whether you are part of it or not, CAMIFF is heading for the sky.’

The Cameroon International Film Festival which is celebrated yearly brings together actors, online content creators, comedians, artists, and those passionate about filmmaking.

Ngimju Brighter, hosting the red carpet for Bliss TV said the opening night, ‘was a mixture of fashion and celebrities… an electrifying experience and a glamorous night.’

About the film, Ngimju said the movie, Half Heaven, is excellent and brings out the dynamic characteristics of the Cameroon Movie Industry.

Master classes will run during the day time till Friday on documentary filmmaking, screenwriting, cinematography, directing, acting, and other movi
e-related fields at the Buea Mountain Hotel.

CAMIFF nights will be spiced with a mask night, an all-white night, a cultural night, and the grand award night on Saturday.

Source: Cameroon News Agency

Ghana needs reclassification of some artisanal canoes


Mr. Richster Nii Armah Amarfio, the Executive Director of the Blue Economy and Governance Consult, has said that Ghana needs a reclassification of its artisanal fishing sector to sustain country’s fisheries sector Mr. Amarfio, who is also the Vice President of the National Fisheries Association of Ghana (NAFAG), said in the past, most of the canoes were smaller, but currently they were bigger and therefore needed to be reclassified as commercial canoes rather than artisanal for proper management.

He was speaking at a Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority (GPHA) media forum on best practices for ensuring fisheries sustainability in Ghana.

He explained that without doing so, it was difficult to manage them, as some of them had big and wide fishing nets that needed to be managed beyond just treating them as artisanal activities, especially when used a mesh size of less than an inch.

Touching on other practices, he said Ghana currently had about 12,000 canoes in its waters, that had been proven to be too much and
contributed to the low catches.

He said the closure of entry for new canoes, even though good, had some challenges, as some might have already received permits from the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources to cut logs for canoe building.

He added that since it was not the Ministry of Fisheries that regulated the forest, until the felling of trees for canoes was capped, it might not be effective.

‘One challenge we have is that if we don’t cap it, the ministry in charge of forestry may have already issued permits for some people to harvest the trees. So even though there is a closure to entry, the closure may only affect new harvesting and not those that may have been harvested already that are there and being carved to be used as canoes,’ he explained.

The NAFAG Vice President stated that the closure of entry for canoes was good for the preservation of the country’s forests, adding, however, that it should probably be

extended to about five years instead of three years to have an early cap and a longer
period for non-entry.

He suggested that as the entry of canoes had been put on hold, there was a need to get alternative avenues of income for the young people in the coastal areas, and must be provided with literacy and numeracy to develop themselves and move out of the industry or bring in advanced skills for sustainable fishing instead of continuing with old, unsustainable practices.

He said: ‘Because if you provide them with basic literacy and numeracy and let them develop so that they can move out of the industry when they start reading and writing and begin to understand, they will begin to do things differently and may want to explore other opportunities; some of them may want to further their education.

‘If you do not create that avenue, then you will have the challenge of creating a lot of unemployment because there won’t be new canoes.’

Mr. Amarfio stressed that currently, the young fishers are mono-skilled; therefore, if there was no space for them in the industry, they became redundant and may
create a danger in society.

Therefore, while the ministry implements the policy and reduces entry into the industry, one of the things it has to look at is how it is going to create opportunities for the younger fishers to learn trade and have education so that they now become useful to themselves beyond fishing.

He said another unsustainable fishing practice was beach seining, in which fishers dragged their nets at the beach, indicating that most of their catches were juveniles and small fish, not allowed to grow to add to the fish population.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Education : Official exams kickoff nationwide with sports and physical education practicals

By Stephen TADAHA

Official exams for the 2023-2024 academic year in the Francophone section have been opened through the launching of the sports and physical education exam practicals.

The launch was done in a ceremony presided over by the Minister of secondary education, Pauline Nalova Lyonga on Monday April 22, 2024 at GTHS Bafang, Upper Plateaux division of the West Region.

Accompanied by her colleague of Sports and physical education, Narcisse Mouelle Kombi, the Minister insisted on the need for school officials to rightfully use the budget allocated for the construction of Sports infrastructure in various secondary schools across the country.

The remark was made after noticing that many secondary schools across the West Region and in most localities in Cameroon lack accommodated sports facilities for the practice of sports lessons and exams because the budget allocated for their construction are always either misused, or embezzled.

The session, organized by the Baccalauréat board, was highly appreci
ated by the member of government who encouraged the candidates to remain concentrated till the end of the exam period.

The sports Minister on his part in also appreciating the session, recalled the importance of Sports in the academic path of learners.

In Cameroon, sports infrastructure in many schools are sometimes being neglected.

Meantime the international charter on Physical Education and Sports (1978), states in its preamble that the effective exercise of human rights depends mostly on the possibility offered to each person to develop and freely preserve their physical, intellect and intellectual means, and consequently, the access of every human being to Physical Education and to Sports, should be assured and guaranteed;

Also, Law N074/22 of 5th December 1974 on Sports and Socio-Educational Equipment reminds in its article 1 that every school or University construction project should include sites for the establishment of Sports and Socio-Educational equipment.

Source: Cameroon News Agency

Education : Official exams kickoff nationwide with sports and physical education practicals

By Stephen TADAHA

Official exams for the 2023-2024 academic year in the Francophone section have been opened through the launching of the sports and physical education exam practicals.

The launch was done in a ceremony presided over by the Minister of secondary education, Pauline Nalova Lyonga on Monday April 22, 2024 at GTHS Bafang, Upper Plateaux division of the West Region.

Accompanied by her colleague of Sports and physical education, Narcisse Mouelle Kombi, the Minister insisted on the need for school officials to rightfully use the budget allocated for the construction of Sports infrastructure in various secondary schools across the country.

The remark was made after noticing that many secondary schools across the West Region and in most localities in Cameroon lack accommodated sports facilities for the practice of sports lessons and exams because the budget allocated for their construction are always either misused, or embezzled.

The session, organized by the Baccalauréat board, was highly appreci
ated by the member of government who encouraged the candidates to remain concentrated till the end of the exam period.

The sports Minister on his part in also appreciating the session, recalled the importance of Sports in the academic path of learners.

In Cameroon, sports infrastructure in many schools are sometimes being neglected.

Meantime the international charter on Physical Education and Sports (1978), states in its preamble that the effective exercise of human rights depends mostly on the possibility offered to each person to develop and freely preserve their physical, intellect and intellectual means, and consequently, the access of every human being to Physical Education and to Sports, should be assured and guaranteed;

Also, Law N074/22 of 5th December 1974 on Sports and Socio-Educational Equipment reminds in its article 1 that every school or University construction project should include sites for the establishment of Sports and Socio-Educational equipment.

Source: Cameroon News Agency

Voyager 1 is sending data back to Earth for the first time in 5 months


For the first time in five months, NASA engineers have received decipherable data from Voyager 1 after crafting a creative solution to fix a communication problem aboard humanity’s most distant spacecraft in the cosmos.

Voyager 1 is currently about 15 billion miles (24 billion kilometers) away, and at 46 years old, the probe has shown multiple quirks and signs of aging in recent years.

The latest issue experienced by Voyager 1 first cropped up in November 2023, when the flight data system’s telemetry modulation unit began sending an indecipherable repeating pattern of code.

Voyager 1’s flight data system collects information from the spacecraft’s science instruments and bundles it with engineering data that reflects its current health status. Mission control on Earth receives that data in binary code, or a series of ones and zeroes.

But since November, Voyager 1’s flight data system had been stuck in a loop. While the probe has continued to relay a steady radio signal to its mission control team on Earth
over the past few months, the signal did not carry any usable data.

The mission team received the first coherent data about the health and status of Voyager 1’s engineering systems on April 20. While the team is still reviewing the information, everything they’ve seen so far suggests Voyager 1 is healthy and operating properly.

‘Today was a great day for Voyager 1,’ said Linda Spilker, Voyager project scientist at JPL, in a statement Saturday. ‘We’re back in communication with the spacecraft. And we look forward to getting science data back.’

The breakthrough came as the result of a clever bit of trial and error and the unraveling of a mystery that led the team to a single chip.

Troubleshooting from billions of miles away

After discovering the issue, the mission team attempted sending commands to restart the spacecraft’s computer system and learn more about the underlying cause of the problem.

The team sent a command called a ‘poke’ to Voyager 1 on March 1 to get the flight data system to run different
software sequences in the hopes of finding out what was causing the glitch.

On March 3, the team noticed that activity from one part of the flight data system stood out from the rest of the garbled data. While the signal wasn’t in the format the Voyager team is used to seeing when the flight data system is functioning as expected, an engineer with NASA’s Deep Space Network was able to decode it.

The Deep Space Network is a system of radio antennae on Earth that help the agency communicate with the Voyager probes and other spacecraft exploring our solar system.

The decoded signal included a readout of the entire flight data system’s memory.

By investigating the readout, the team determined the cause of the issue: 3% of the flight data system’s memory is corrupted. A single chip responsible for storing part of the system’s memory, including some of the computer’s software code, isn’t working properly. While the cause of the chip’s failure is unknown, it could be worn out or may have been hit by an energetic
particle from space, the team said.

The loss of the code on the chip caused Voyager 1’s science and engineering data to be unusable.

Since there was no way to repair the chip, the team opted to store the affected code from the chip elsewhere in the system’s memory. While they couldn’t pinpoint a location large enough to hold all of the code, they were able to divide the code into sections and store it in different spots within the flight data system.

‘To make this plan work, they also needed to adjust those code sections to ensure, for example, that they all still function as a whole,’ according to an update from NASA. ‘Any references to the location of that code in other parts of the (flight data system) memory needed to be updated as well.’

After determining the code necessary for packaging Voyager 1’s engineering data, engineers sent a radio signal to the probe commanding the code to a new location in the system’s memory on April 18.

Given Voyager 1’s immense distance from Earth, it takes a radio sign
al about 22.5 hours to reach the probe, and another 22.5 hours for a response signal from the spacecraft to reach Earth.

On April 20, the team received Voyager 1’s response indicating that the clever code modification had worked, and they could finally receive readable engineering data from the probe once more.

Exploring interstellar space

Within the coming weeks, the team will continue to relocate other affected parts of the system’s software, including those responsible for returning the valuable science data Voyager 1 is collecting.

Initially designed to last five years, the Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, launched in 1977 and are the longest operating spacecraft in history. Their exceptionally long life spans mean that both spacecraft have provided additional insights about our solar system and beyond after achieving their preliminary goals of flying by Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune decades ago.

The probes are currently venturing through uncharted cosmic territory along the outer reaches of
the solar system. Both are in interstellar space and are the only spacecraft ever to operate beyond the heliosphere, the sun’s bubble of magnetic fields and particles that extends well beyond the orbit of Pluto.

Voyager 2, which is operating normally, has traveled more than 12.6 billion miles (20.3 billion kilometers) from our planet.

Source: Ghana News Agency

The Plastic Menace: Our environment, our survival


Thirteen-year-old Mbabota and his younger siblings, aged 10 and seven years, scavenge every weekend on farmland and dumping sites at the Kumbosigo and Yarigabiisi communities in the Upper East Region when school is not in session, to collect waste plastics, sachets and metals.

This is a routine the three never get tired of despite Mbabota’s sore leg.

The leg became sore due to a cut he sustained from a previous escapade when a broken bottle on a farm cut him. The dusty bandage tied round his ankle does not deter him.

The waste plastics and scrap they collect include plates, cups, buckets and empty water bottles and sachets.

The children engage in this almost on daily basis to send to the scrap dealers, especially the one at the corner of the village, where the items are weighed, and payment made accordingly.

Plight of the Siblings

Mbabota, a primary six pupil, told the Ghana News Agency (GNA) that he used the proceeds to buy food and sometimes writing materials, especially exercise books, pens and penci
ls for school.

The involvement of children in such activities for money, though not new in the country, continues to expose them to health hazzards.

This action also exposes them to environmental harm, abuse of their rights. Their development is also impeded.

The Sustainable Development Goal-Three advocates ensuring healthy lives and promoting the well-being at all ages before 2030.

However, the story of the three siblings and many others is gaining momentum in most communities due to indiscriminate disposal of liter recently.

This growing phenomenon of plastic pollution in Ghana has been a teeth gnashing problem where a glance at the surroundings in most communities has become nauseating.

Yet it seems every government has thrown in the towel in finding a lasting solution to the problem, despite many political campaign pledges to rid the cities, towns and communities of filth.

Thus, the plastic menace has over the years become a persistent pollutant to the environment and a threat to life on earth and
aquatic life.

However, the Sustainable Development Goal 14.1 advocates interventions to prevent both marine pollution of all kinds and land based activities that pollute the environment.

Political Pledges on Environment

President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, under the National Plastic Action Partnership (NPAP), pledged a new game changer in the country’s plastic management through the promotion of green alternatives to nurture and develop new business models for job creation throughout the value chain.

The Partnership also aims to develop systems and infrastructure across the country to ensure that the waste is turned into value added products.

With this partnership and collaborative work under its Global Plastic Action Partnership (GPAP), which aims to create a world free of plastic pollution, there should have been signs of improvement but this value addition targets are still farfetched.

Situation in the Communities

In every market and super-market in Ghana, apart from some products purely produced
by the manufacturers with paper packages, most products are packaged in single-use plastics, ranging from kitchen ingredients to toiletries and drinking water.

The average Ghanaian comes into contact with all types of plastics often described as, ‘take away’ on daily basis. At special occasions like funerals, outdooring, weddings and community durbars, plastics are commonly used to serve food and drinks.

Plastic bottles and sachet disposed of haphazardly, with some thrown out of moving vehicles, usually lodged in gutters and finally washed into the sea.

An environmental situation report by Interactive Country Fiches estimates that more than 3000 metric tonnes of plastic is generated daily, and one million tonnes generated yearly in Ghana.

An estimated 86 per cent of Ghana’s plastic waste load is improperly disposed of resulting in choked gutters, drains, rivers and streams.

The same report said an estimated 250,000 tonnes of plastic waste in Ghana were dumped into the Atlantic Ocean yearly.

Mr Pius Akam
be, the Bolgatanga Municipal Environmental and Sanitation Officer, in an interview with the GNA, said reducing the volumes of plastic waste required sensitisation of the public on the harmful effects of the plastics on humans, animals, and the environment.

School children could also be targeted and educated on plastic pollution and can be agents of change for their peers and communities.

‘Stopping the littering and pollution of the environment is a responsibility of all citizens because government and the assemblies cannot do it alone,’ he said.

Recycling of Plastic Waste

The efforts to clear the environment of waste plastic, though might have been specified in the local content regulations of recycling plants, both for turning solid and liquid waste into reusable products, the five regions of the north are yet to make full use of the benefits from these industries concerning waste management.

In 2020, the ground was broken for one of such recycling plants at Sirigu in the Bolgatanga Municipality of the
Upper East Region, but the project had stalled due to politicisation, which had bedevilled many other projects.

Implication for the five regions of the north

As farming hubs, the already changing weather patterns and poor soils are affecting food security while farmers are contending with the plastic menace as it contributes to poor plant growth and yield.

Plastic materials are not degradable and so are stuck in the soil preventing seed germination, while animal health is also impacted, as most of them died after feeding on leftover food contained in plastics, which get entangled in their digestive processes.

Challenges of Stakeholders in the Waste Material Business

Alhaji Mohammed Sule, a businessman, dealer of scraps and plastics in the Bolgatanga East District, reiterated the high cost of transportation of such scraps and plastics to Accra for recycling purposes.

According to him, a long vehicle conveying full load of scrap cost him between GHC150,000 and GHC200,000 to Accra.

He said buyers were mor
e interested in scrap as compared to plastics, thereby making the plastic business not lucrative.

Recommendation

The plastic problem requires steadfast and consistent commitment by government and all stakeholders to achieve the desired change. Special initiatives should be established by the Government and the private sector to find nature-based solutions to dealing with plastic waste.

This is because millions of these plastics, both bag and bottles, are being produced every day with just a little of it being recycled.

This calls for a lifestyle change to end plastic pollution. There should be a complete rethinking and changing of attitudes towards production, usage, and disposal of plastics.

The producers and consumers must consider environmental health first as the only place for survival when dealing with the ”use once and throw away plastics lifestyle”, which is killing the environment.

The public should rather refuse non-essential plastics and promote re-use and refill practices.

Also, innovatio
n, especially using local ecological materials, should be promoted to replace plastics while sound waste management must be enforced to prevent plastic waste from entering the environment.

All hands must be on deck as much would not be achieved if sections of the public transition while others continue their normal ways of plastic usage.

Source: Ghana News Agency

The Plastic Menace: Our environment, our survival


Thirteen-year-old Mbabota and his younger siblings, aged 10 and seven years, scavenge every weekend on farmland and dumping sites at the Kumbosigo and Yarigabiisi communities in the Upper East Region when school is not in session, to collect waste plastics, sachets and metals.

This is a routine the three never get tired of despite Mbabota’s sore leg.

The leg became sore due to a cut he sustained from a previous escapade when a broken bottle on a farm cut him. The dusty bandage tied round his ankle does not deter him.

The waste plastics and scrap they collect include plates, cups, buckets and empty water bottles and sachets.

The children engage in this almost on daily basis to send to the scrap dealers, especially the one at the corner of the village, where the items are weighed, and payment made accordingly.

Plight of the Siblings

Mbabota, a primary six pupil, told the Ghana News Agency (GNA) that he used the proceeds to buy food and sometimes writing materials, especially exercise books, pens and penci
ls for school.

The involvement of children in such activities for money, though not new in the country, continues to expose them to health hazzards.

This action also exposes them to environmental harm, abuse of their rights. Their development is also impeded.

The Sustainable Development Goal-Three advocates ensuring healthy lives and promoting the well-being at all ages before 2030.

However, the story of the three siblings and many others is gaining momentum in most communities due to indiscriminate disposal of liter recently.

This growing phenomenon of plastic pollution in Ghana has been a teeth gnashing problem where a glance at the surroundings in most communities has become nauseating.

Yet it seems every government has thrown in the towel in finding a lasting solution to the problem, despite many political campaign pledges to rid the cities, towns and communities of filth.

Thus, the plastic menace has over the years become a persistent pollutant to the environment and a threat to life on earth and
aquatic life.

However, the Sustainable Development Goal 14.1 advocates interventions to prevent both marine pollution of all kinds and land based activities that pollute the environment.

Political Pledges on Environment

President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, under the National Plastic Action Partnership (NPAP), pledged a new game changer in the country’s plastic management through the promotion of green alternatives to nurture and develop new business models for job creation throughout the value chain.

The Partnership also aims to develop systems and infrastructure across the country to ensure that the waste is turned into value added products.

With this partnership and collaborative work under its Global Plastic Action Partnership (GPAP), which aims to create a world free of plastic pollution, there should have been signs of improvement but this value addition targets are still farfetched.

Situation in the Communities

In every market and super-market in Ghana, apart from some products purely produced
by the manufacturers with paper packages, most products are packaged in single-use plastics, ranging from kitchen ingredients to toiletries and drinking water.

The average Ghanaian comes into contact with all types of plastics often described as, ‘take away’ on daily basis. At special occasions like funerals, outdooring, weddings and community durbars, plastics are commonly used to serve food and drinks.

Plastic bottles and sachet disposed of haphazardly, with some thrown out of moving vehicles, usually lodged in gutters and finally washed into the sea.

An environmental situation report by Interactive Country Fiches estimates that more than 3000 metric tonnes of plastic is generated daily, and one million tonnes generated yearly in Ghana.

An estimated 86 per cent of Ghana’s plastic waste load is improperly disposed of resulting in choked gutters, drains, rivers and streams.

The same report said an estimated 250,000 tonnes of plastic waste in Ghana were dumped into the Atlantic Ocean yearly.

Mr Pius Akam
be, the Bolgatanga Municipal Environmental and Sanitation Officer, in an interview with the GNA, said reducing the volumes of plastic waste required sensitisation of the public on the harmful effects of the plastics on humans, animals, and the environment.

School children could also be targeted and educated on plastic pollution and can be agents of change for their peers and communities.

‘Stopping the littering and pollution of the environment is a responsibility of all citizens because government and the assemblies cannot do it alone,’ he said.

Recycling of Plastic Waste

The efforts to clear the environment of waste plastic, though might have been specified in the local content regulations of recycling plants, both for turning solid and liquid waste into reusable products, the five regions of the north are yet to make full use of the benefits from these industries concerning waste management.

In 2020, the ground was broken for one of such recycling plants at Sirigu in the Bolgatanga Municipality of the
Upper East Region, but the project had stalled due to politicisation, which had bedevilled many other projects.

Implication for the five regions of the north

As farming hubs, the already changing weather patterns and poor soils are affecting food security while farmers are contending with the plastic menace as it contributes to poor plant growth and yield.

Plastic materials are not degradable and so are stuck in the soil preventing seed germination, while animal health is also impacted, as most of them died after feeding on leftover food contained in plastics, which get entangled in their digestive processes.

Challenges of Stakeholders in the Waste Material Business

Alhaji Mohammed Sule, a businessman, dealer of scraps and plastics in the Bolgatanga East District, reiterated the high cost of transportation of such scraps and plastics to Accra for recycling purposes.

According to him, a long vehicle conveying full load of scrap cost him between GHC150,000 and GHC200,000 to Accra.

He said buyers were mor
e interested in scrap as compared to plastics, thereby making the plastic business not lucrative.

Recommendation

The plastic problem requires steadfast and consistent commitment by government and all stakeholders to achieve the desired change. Special initiatives should be established by the Government and the private sector to find nature-based solutions to dealing with plastic waste.

This is because millions of these plastics, both bag and bottles, are being produced every day with just a little of it being recycled.

This calls for a lifestyle change to end plastic pollution. There should be a complete rethinking and changing of attitudes towards production, usage, and disposal of plastics.

The producers and consumers must consider environmental health first as the only place for survival when dealing with the ”use once and throw away plastics lifestyle”, which is killing the environment.

The public should rather refuse non-essential plastics and promote re-use and refill practices.

Also, innovatio
n, especially using local ecological materials, should be promoted to replace plastics while sound waste management must be enforced to prevent plastic waste from entering the environment.

All hands must be on deck as much would not be achieved if sections of the public transition while others continue their normal ways of plastic usage.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Physically challenged souter urges youth to embrace skills training?


Mr Moses Tettey, a physically challenged souter (shoe mender) at Dzelukope, a suburb of Keta in the Volta Region, said his work should inspire the youth to acquire artistic skills and vocations for a brighter future.

That, he said, would help mitigate unemployment among the youth in the area and boost productivity.?

‘I learned and completed this job in 1996 at school, and it has helped me cater for my family and many other things. I cannot sit at home just because of my condition. It is dangerous to be idle,’ he added.

Mr Tettey, popularly known in the shoe-making business as ‘Mobisco,’ in an interview with the Ghana News Agency, touched on the importance of encouraging the youth to venture into skills and vocational training to acquire specific skills through which they could make a living.

‘The level of unemployment in Keta is on the rise every day, and what you will see the youth doing these days include staying and playing under trees for nothing,’ he stated.

He lamented how some got involved in frau
dulent activities, like money laundering, which could jeopardise their future.

Mr Tettey urged the Government to help address unemployment in the area by providing job models for the youth.

Now an experienced expert in bags and shoe manufacturing, he charged other PWDs to desist from begging for arms in the various communities but rather engage in skills training, saying disability could not prevent anyone from working.

He commended the Keta Municipal Social Welfare Department for the support extended to PWDs so far.

Mr Tettey appealed to philanthropists, individuals, corporate entities, and the Government to support him to expand his business to train others.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Physically challenged souter urges youth to embrace skills training?


Mr Moses Tettey, a physically challenged souter (shoe mender) at Dzelukope, a suburb of Keta in the Volta Region, said his work should inspire the youth to acquire artistic skills and vocations for a brighter future.

That, he said, would help mitigate unemployment among the youth in the area and boost productivity.?

‘I learned and completed this job in 1996 at school, and it has helped me cater for my family and many other things. I cannot sit at home just because of my condition. It is dangerous to be idle,’ he added.

Mr Tettey, popularly known in the shoe-making business as ‘Mobisco,’ in an interview with the Ghana News Agency, touched on the importance of encouraging the youth to venture into skills and vocational training to acquire specific skills through which they could make a living.

‘The level of unemployment in Keta is on the rise every day, and what you will see the youth doing these days include staying and playing under trees for nothing,’ he stated.

He lamented how some got involved in frau
dulent activities, like money laundering, which could jeopardise their future.

Mr Tettey urged the Government to help address unemployment in the area by providing job models for the youth.

Now an experienced expert in bags and shoe manufacturing, he charged other PWDs to desist from begging for arms in the various communities but rather engage in skills training, saying disability could not prevent anyone from working.

He commended the Keta Municipal Social Welfare Department for the support extended to PWDs so far.

Mr Tettey appealed to philanthropists, individuals, corporate entities, and the Government to support him to expand his business to train others.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Elizha bags Artiste of the Year nomination at 2024 Ghana Music Awards USA


Music sensation Elizha has been nominated Artiste of the Year at the upcoming Ghana Music Awards (GMA) USA.

The singer/songwriter, who had a stellar year under review, grabbed six more nominations, including Female Vocalist of the Year, Music Video of the Year, Song of the Year, Afropop/Afrobeats Artiste of the Year, and Female Artiste of the Year.

The US-based Ghanaian singer excelled with her ‘Bad Love’ single in 2023, which recorded impressive streaming numbers across various digital platforms and made waves globally.

During last year’s GMA USA, Elizha was adjudged the Best Female Vocalist after dropping some groundbreaking hit songs, including ‘RoadTown,’ ‘Lijeje,’ and ‘Police.’

The songstress recently recorded a milestone after featuring award-winning Jamaican producer and artiste, Anthony B, on her new single ‘Sugar,’ which is also making waves.

Source: Ghana News Agency

Police officer dead, two others receiving treatment


General Lance Corporal Solomon Tetteh of the Central Regional Police Patrol Team was killed on Monday when a vehicle collided with the police car, he and his colleagues were in.

The deceased, General Corporal Michael Darasam, and General Constable Nashiru Musah all sustained injuries after falling from the vehicle.

They were rushed to the Winneba Trauma and Specialist Hospital for treatment, but Tetteh died.

According to a police report, the suspect driver fled the scene of the accident and is currently being sought.

The report said on Monday, April 22, 2024, at about 1145 hours, the Police in Ojobi received information regarding an accident involving four vehicles at Akotsi Junction.

Following the information, Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) Samuel Asante, District Commander of the Motor Traffic and Transport Department, and his officers went to the location to investigate.

The investigation revealed that a KIA Rhino truck with the trading number GX4135-20 coming from Akraman to Ojobi collided wi
th a Nissan Navara pickup with the registration number GT3174 Z at the Akotsi intersection on the main Kasoa-Winneba highway.

The KIA truck driver drove about 30 meters into the Akotsi-Ojobi road and collided with another Nissan Urvan bus before crashing into the Regional Operation Patrol team vehicle that was carrying a seven-man squad.

The suspect driver then dragged the Police Service vehicle with the registration number GP 483 over 22 metres before entering a nearby metal container, where the three police officers fell off.

The vehicles involved in the accident have been impounded for investigation, testing, and subsequent action.

Source: Ghana News Agency